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NPS Survey Template

Build and launch an interactive net promoter score (NPS) survey using this template. Learn about how customers feel, and act on their responses immediately.

Use the NPS template to:

  • Evaluate customer perception of your brand or products.
  • Learn about your customers’ experience with your product.
  • Assess customer satisfaction and loyalty.
  • Discover how many of your customers are likely to recommend you to their friends and family.
  • Use the survey data to drive better business decisions, conduct market research, improve your product or service, and develop a marketing strategy.

Why use Stonly’s NPS template?

  • Create interactive net promoter score surveys. Launch easy-to-use surveys your customer will be happy to respond to.
  • Develop powerful post-survey workflows. Build different paths based on each customer’s survey response. Ask custom follow-up questions or prompt happy customers to promote you while they’re engaged.
  • Evaluate insights and survey results. Use Stonly’s dashboard to monitor survey success in real-time and review customers’ feedback.
  • Launch the NPS survey through every channel you use to communicate with customers. Make it a part of your website or app, or share the survey link via email or live chat.

What are the Net Promoter Score and NPS survey?

Net promoter score (NPS) is the foundation for developing and improving customer satisfaction.

But to understand the benefits of NPS fully, we must first differentiate between its two distinct concepts:

  1. The net promoter score
  2. An NPS survey

Both are often referred to as NPS. However, each term refers to a different aspect of the net promoter score strategy:

Net promoter score is a percentage metric measuring customer experience and loyalty.

In short, NPS measures how many of the company’s customers are likely to recommend it to their family, friends, or colleagues.

NPS data - called the NPS score - reveals the percentage breakdown of customer experience and loyalty over time, dividing the customer base into three categories:

  • Promoters. These people are your most loyal and satisfied customers. They are extremely likely to recommend your products or company to others. Promoters rank 9-10 on the NPS scale.
  • Passives. These customers enjoy your products or services. However, you haven’t engaged them in the same way as you have with Promoters. Passives might recommend you and remain loyal to your company, but it’s not guaranteed. Passives typically score between 7-8 on the NPS scale.
  • Detractors. The last group includes unhappy and unsatisfied customers. But the significance of this group goes beyond them not being happy with your offering. Detractors often publicly share their negative experiences, generate negative word-of-mouth, and can stall your business growth.

An NPS survey, on the other hand, is a strategy that allows you to determine the company’s net promoter score. In order to measure and track your net promoter score over time, you need to run an NPS survey.

How does an NPS survey work?

An NPS survey asks customers two questions:

  1. How likely are you to recommend us to a friend or colleague?
  2. Why did you give us that score?

We refer to the first one as a “rating question.” It prompts a person to evaluate their likelihood of recommending a business to others using a scale of 0-10. Based on the person’s score, you can determine whether they are a promoter, passive, or a detractor of your brand.

The other question, however, has an open-ended form and is often customized to specific responders. We call it the “follow-up question.” Its goal is to uncover why a person scored a business the way they did.

Of the two, the first question is more critical in an NPS survey. In fact, you’ll find some brands skipping the follow-up, focusing only on uncovering the person’s score. However, the follow-up question can be a great way to receive feedback directly from your customers. It gives them an opportunity to tell you what you’re doing right and where you can make improvements.

How to run an NPS survey

Running an NPS survey requires dedicated survey software that allows you to:

  • Create the survey fast. Ideally, the software would let you use a predefined template that you can customize to your needs.
  • Target different customer segments. Create interactive NPS surveys that allow you to target different groups with specific follow-up questions.
  • Use your company’s preferred channels. Whether it’s an email, a link on a website, or an embedded survey, the tool must deliver the survey to customers, regardless of where they are.
  • Analyze the data. The right tool will help you track responses, analyze the data, and better understand your NPS results.

Stonly is a dedicated survey tool with an elegant, easy-to-use NPS template built-in. Use it to launch an actionable NPS survey, learn more about your customer experiences, evaluate their loyalty, and use their feedback to drive better decisions.

(Note that aside from embedding the survey online, you can also use it in-app and share a link to it through email or live chat.)

How to write NPS survey questions (with examples)

The rating question inquires only about the likelihood of a referral from a person. Most companies use a simple template in their NPS surveys:

“On a scale of 0 to 10, how likely are you to recommend [BRAND or PRODUCT NAME] to a friend or colleague?”

Because of its simplicity, the question is easy for customers to answer and delivers meaningful feedback to the company about customer experience and loyalty.

Plus, you can customize it to your brand or the type of customer relationship.

For example, if you’re launching the survey right after a person has completed a purchase, you can reference that fact in the question:

“Based on your recent shopping experience with [BRAND or PRODUCT NAME], on a scale of 0 to 10, how likely are you to recommend it to a friend or colleague?”

Writing the follow-up question requires more planning.

First, the question takes an open-ended format, allowing you to inquire about the person’s perception of you and your products. Second, it pops up on screen right after the person has given their NPS score.

Because of that, the question allows you to dig deeper into their motivations and experiences.

However, to get meaningful insights, you must plan the question and focus on the right customer segment.

Most commonly, brands target passives and detractors. You want to know why those customers aren’t satisfied with your product or service or willing to recommend you.

Constructing the follow-up question around those issues will collect feedback to drive improvements around the business.

Here are some approaches you could take when writing follow-up NPS questions:

  • Ask about the reason for the score: “Why did you give us that score?” Note: You could target all three NPS segments with this question. Its generic nature would allow promoters, passives, and detractors to share their feedback.
  • Ask detractors why they wouldn’t recommend you to others: “Why would you not recommend [BRAND or PRODUCT NAME]?”
  • Ask passives and detractors for ideas to improve your company or product: “What could we improve to make you change your mind?”

How to take action on your NPS survey results in real time

After a user gives a score, and maybe some additional feedback, companies usually thank them and send them on their way.

However, this is a missed opportunity to further engage an already-engaged customer. With Stonly, you can build different paths for users depending on how they answered.

Here are a few examples:

  • If a user gave you a great score, ask them to promote you right away. Prompt them to give you a good review on a ratings site like G2 or Capterra.
  • If a customer gives you a decent review, prompt them to schedule a call so you can help them get the most out of your product or service.
  • If a customer gives you a bad review, ask follow-up questions to learn more and better bucket responses for easier analysis.

Looking for an NPS template to help you collect NPS feedback? Launch an actionable NPS survey in minutes with Stonly.

Browse templates

NPS Survey Template

Build and launch an interactive net promoter score (NPS) survey using this template. Learn about how customers feel, and act on their responses immediately.

Use the NPS template to:

  • Evaluate customer perception of your brand or products.
  • Learn about your customers’ experience with your product.
  • Assess customer satisfaction and loyalty.
  • Discover how many of your customers are likely to recommend you to their friends and family.
  • Use the survey data to drive better business decisions, conduct market research, improve your product or service, and develop a marketing strategy.

Why use Stonly’s NPS template?

  • Create interactive net promoter score surveys. Launch easy-to-use surveys your customer will be happy to respond to.
  • Develop powerful post-survey workflows. Build different paths based on each customer’s survey response. Ask custom follow-up questions or prompt happy customers to promote you while they’re engaged.
  • Evaluate insights and survey results. Use Stonly’s dashboard to monitor survey success in real-time and review customers’ feedback.
  • Launch the NPS survey through every channel you use to communicate with customers. Make it a part of your website or app, or share the survey link via email or live chat.

What are the Net Promoter Score and NPS survey?

Net promoter score (NPS) is the foundation for developing and improving customer satisfaction.

But to understand the benefits of NPS fully, we must first differentiate between its two distinct concepts:

  1. The net promoter score
  2. An NPS survey

Both are often referred to as NPS. However, each term refers to a different aspect of the net promoter score strategy:

Net promoter score is a percentage metric measuring customer experience and loyalty.

In short, NPS measures how many of the company’s customers are likely to recommend it to their family, friends, or colleagues.

NPS data - called the NPS score - reveals the percentage breakdown of customer experience and loyalty over time, dividing the customer base into three categories:

  • Promoters. These people are your most loyal and satisfied customers. They are extremely likely to recommend your products or company to others. Promoters rank 9-10 on the NPS scale.
  • Passives. These customers enjoy your products or services. However, you haven’t engaged them in the same way as you have with Promoters. Passives might recommend you and remain loyal to your company, but it’s not guaranteed. Passives typically score between 7-8 on the NPS scale.
  • Detractors. The last group includes unhappy and unsatisfied customers. But the significance of this group goes beyond them not being happy with your offering. Detractors often publicly share their negative experiences, generate negative word-of-mouth, and can stall your business growth.

An NPS survey, on the other hand, is a strategy that allows you to determine the company’s net promoter score. In order to measure and track your net promoter score over time, you need to run an NPS survey.

How does an NPS survey work?

An NPS survey asks customers two questions:

  1. How likely are you to recommend us to a friend or colleague?
  2. Why did you give us that score?

We refer to the first one as a “rating question.” It prompts a person to evaluate their likelihood of recommending a business to others using a scale of 0-10. Based on the person’s score, you can determine whether they are a promoter, passive, or a detractor of your brand.

The other question, however, has an open-ended form and is often customized to specific responders. We call it the “follow-up question.” Its goal is to uncover why a person scored a business the way they did.

Of the two, the first question is more critical in an NPS survey. In fact, you’ll find some brands skipping the follow-up, focusing only on uncovering the person’s score. However, the follow-up question can be a great way to receive feedback directly from your customers. It gives them an opportunity to tell you what you’re doing right and where you can make improvements.

How to run an NPS survey

Running an NPS survey requires dedicated survey software that allows you to:

  • Create the survey fast. Ideally, the software would let you use a predefined template that you can customize to your needs.
  • Target different customer segments. Create interactive NPS surveys that allow you to target different groups with specific follow-up questions.
  • Use your company’s preferred channels. Whether it’s an email, a link on a website, or an embedded survey, the tool must deliver the survey to customers, regardless of where they are.
  • Analyze the data. The right tool will help you track responses, analyze the data, and better understand your NPS results.

Stonly is a dedicated survey tool with an elegant, easy-to-use NPS template built-in. Use it to launch an actionable NPS survey, learn more about your customer experiences, evaluate their loyalty, and use their feedback to drive better decisions.

(Note that aside from embedding the survey online, you can also use it in-app and share a link to it through email or live chat.)

How to write NPS survey questions (with examples)

The rating question inquires only about the likelihood of a referral from a person. Most companies use a simple template in their NPS surveys:

“On a scale of 0 to 10, how likely are you to recommend [BRAND or PRODUCT NAME] to a friend or colleague?”

Because of its simplicity, the question is easy for customers to answer and delivers meaningful feedback to the company about customer experience and loyalty.

Plus, you can customize it to your brand or the type of customer relationship.

For example, if you’re launching the survey right after a person has completed a purchase, you can reference that fact in the question:

“Based on your recent shopping experience with [BRAND or PRODUCT NAME], on a scale of 0 to 10, how likely are you to recommend it to a friend or colleague?”

Writing the follow-up question requires more planning.

First, the question takes an open-ended format, allowing you to inquire about the person’s perception of you and your products. Second, it pops up on screen right after the person has given their NPS score.

Because of that, the question allows you to dig deeper into their motivations and experiences.

However, to get meaningful insights, you must plan the question and focus on the right customer segment.

Most commonly, brands target passives and detractors. You want to know why those customers aren’t satisfied with your product or service or willing to recommend you.

Constructing the follow-up question around those issues will collect feedback to drive improvements around the business.

Here are some approaches you could take when writing follow-up NPS questions:

  • Ask about the reason for the score: “Why did you give us that score?” Note: You could target all three NPS segments with this question. Its generic nature would allow promoters, passives, and detractors to share their feedback.
  • Ask detractors why they wouldn’t recommend you to others: “Why would you not recommend [BRAND or PRODUCT NAME]?”
  • Ask passives and detractors for ideas to improve your company or product: “What could we improve to make you change your mind?”

How to take action on your NPS survey results in real time

After a user gives a score, and maybe some additional feedback, companies usually thank them and send them on their way.

However, this is a missed opportunity to further engage an already-engaged customer. With Stonly, you can build different paths for users depending on how they answered.

Here are a few examples:

  • If a user gave you a great score, ask them to promote you right away. Prompt them to give you a good review on a ratings site like G2 or Capterra.
  • If a customer gives you a decent review, prompt them to schedule a call so you can help them get the most out of your product or service.
  • If a customer gives you a bad review, ask follow-up questions to learn more and better bucket responses for easier analysis.

Looking for an NPS template to help you collect NPS feedback? Launch an actionable NPS survey in minutes with Stonly.